Music City Gets a Music Accelerator

music accelerator

In this episode of Serious Startups, we get hyperlocal and talk about the new music accelerator coming to Nashville.

I loved this discussion because with Kane so deep into the music business, he had some great insights into why Project Music will be a great asset to Nashville–or perhaps another stumbling block?

There’s so much going on in Nashville these days. Everywhere you look there are more cranes and buildings and “Now Hiring” signs. If you haven’t been to Nashville before–and have an idea for a music business startup–make sure you apply to Project Music. The mentorship and investment could be game changing for you and your startup.

How to Start a Career In Your 30s

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I stood huddled in the bathroom stall, texting furiously. My hands were shaking and my breathing shallow as I tried to screw up my courage to just walk out of the bathroom.

Outside the crowd grew, and I could hear the music kicking in. Everyone was arriving, ready for an exciting night. Me? I was stuck in the bathroom, too afraid to join the party, too proud to leave.

I really wish I could say this is a story about high school, but I would be lying.

This happened almost 2 years ago. I was 30 years old, and petrified of my first “networking event.” (It would be months before I even heard that term.)

In my defense, I had spent my 20s bearing and raising children. I always felt a vague dissatisfaction with my choice to stay home with my kids, but I hadn’t done anything about it. Now, thanks to a family friend, I was arriving at this “networking event” with a half-baked idea and the chance to “meet people.”

Obviously, I was terrified.

My story, like everyone’s, is unique, but in today’s fast paced world, reinvention is common. And jumping into any new venture, environment, or group can be difficult. I often still feel like I’m navigating unfamiliar terrain, but here are a few things I’ve learned since that first horrific night.

Network, Network, Network

And network some more.

I don’t mean the type of networking that has gotten a bad rap. Handing out business cards indiscriminately at every event isn’t the way to build a lasting network.

I mean a strong, deep network of people who know you and believe you’re capable of reaching your goals. It takes time to build a real network, but putting in the effort will be invaluable.

I recently witnessed the power of a deep network when a friend lost his job. The experience could’ve been a huge blow, both personally and financially. But, because he’s put in years of getting to know people and consistently doing good work, he hasn’t missed a paycheck. Dozens of people jumped at the chance to help him.

A strong network will help you flesh out ideas, guide your thinking, and create opportunities you could never imagine, much less create, on your own.

That night in the bathroom stall, I had no network. I knew one person at the event, and him not very well at the time. Now, 2 years later, when I’m feeling stuck on something, I have a long list of people who are willing to help me get unstuck. And, I still seek every opportunity to find and build genuine relationships with new people.

Shut Up and Listen

When you’re new to an industry, you don’t know anything. You might have some assumptions and theories and you may have spent hours researching on the Internet, but trust me, you’re mostly ignorant.

For a period of time, the best strategy is to shut up and listen to every conversation you can. This applies to virtual conversations on social media as well as in-person conversations with experts.

It’s tempting to want to jump into conversations before we’re ready, to prove that we can keep up. More often, though, listening closely to the debates and arguments that pop up will teach you more than you could ever learn from the Internet.

Along those lines, don’t be afraid to ask questions.

That night, I walked into a startup event and heard the terms “VC,” “angel,” and “the cloud,” for the first time. (Do “angels” live on “the cloud,” by chance??) A Google search cleared up some of my confusion, but I finally had to pull my friend aside and get some clarity on a few of the terms.

If you don’t want to look stupid (my problem), find that one person you can trust with your stupidity. The more questions you ask, the quicker you learn. People like to be trusted with questions, and asking them shows your respect and confidence in that person.

And like my friend assured me then, before long you’ll be the one people see as the expert.

Fake It ‘Til You Make It

This is one of my favorite pieces of advice, but I think it’s often misunderstood.

I don’t mean fake knowledge or expertise you don’t have. That’s a good way to lose the trust and confidence of the people around you.

Rather, I mean fake the confidence you don’t have until you have it.

You may know that you don’t know anything about your new field, but the people you’re meeting don’t know that. And even more likely, they don’t care very much. Act like your success is inevitable and before long, it will be.

I finally left the bathroom stall that night, by the way. Many of the people in that room became my first mentors and some of my best friends. Two years later, I’ve met more people and done more things than I ever thought possible while hiding in the bathroom, including selling my first company.

And, I think ultimately, that’s my most important piece of advice for someone looking to forge a new career in their 30s (or any time):

Quit hiding and get started.

What Fantasy Football Can Teach You About Hiring for Your Startup

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My startup, Speek, raised our Series A funding in March, and we’ve had to grow rapidly since. Our product and engineering teams redesigned our in-call experience and launched screen share for our Pro and Business users. In the meantime, I’ve been putting together a strong team to launch our new conference calling service, Speek for Business.

You need more than one type of player to ensure your success. While drafting for my fantasy football league this year, I realized that there similarities between the strategic approach of putting together a strong fantasy team and evaluating applicants for a successful startup.

Great Resumes Don’t Always Matter

Every player in fantasy football has statistics that break down the player’s previous performance and can be used to rank against other players for specific positions. Just because a player has had great stats for the past year or two, doesn’t mean that he will perform well.

A great receiver on a team with an injured quarterback will probably not do well that season, but you wouldn’t be able to see this just from the statistics. Fantasy football fanatics will tell you to look past the stats and do your due diligence.

Startups don’t hire people based solely on their resumes. The ‘stats’ from resumes gives useful information about the candidate’s professional experience, but it doesn’t give the full picture. Not everyone is cut out for the startup work environment, and most importantly your startup’s culture. Work hours and responsibilities can change rapidly as the startup grows, which means people have to be very comfortable in a flexible (and sometimes chaotic) work environment.

Focus on asking the important questions during the interview. If you’re still not sure, then it’s time to call and question the references. Work ethic, ambition, drive and flexibility are all crucial factors of a strong candidate for a growing startup.

Hire for the Position

In fantasy football, you’re looking to hire top players who specialize in specific positions on the team: quarterback, running backs, wide receivers, etc. This translates well to hiring for a startup. When hiring, you should be looking for people with strengths that complement the weaknesses of the team. Just because you’re doing a little bit of everything doesn’t mean you should surround yourself with people doing the same.

Furthermore, if you have too many people who are jack-of-all-trades types, you’ll be facing a situation where your team doesn’t have any strengths in any specific areas. So before you think of hiring a salesperson who can also handle the accounting, you should take a step back and consider if the budget allows you to hire two people instead. You want to get the most value from each position.

Look for the People on the Rise (aka Sleepers)

Just because you have the best player on your team doesn’t mean that you’ll win the league. For every celebrity football player with a multimillion-dollar contract, there is a line of hungry players who have the skills, drive and ambition to prove that they are top-tier. While most people tend to focus on getting the top players for their team, fantasy football veterans are strategically looking for “sleepers” who will take their team to victory.

So look past the resume and hire for the team. Hiring an expert at the expense of your team can derail your chance at victory. Focus on hiring people who have the talent, drive and ambition to take their skills to the next level.

A startup consisting of over-performing and talented members can be contagious, and increase your chance of making it to the winner’s circle.

Danny Boice is the cofounder & president of Speek. Speek lets users do conference calls with a simple link (speek.com/YourName) rather than using phone numbers and PINs. Boice attended Harvard, is an adjunct professor at Georgetown, and was recently named a Tech Titan by Washingtonian Magazine. You can find Danny on Twitter@DannyBoice or on LinkedIn.

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

Serious Startups: The Nashville NEXT Awards

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We’re really excited for our friends featured in the NEXT Awards, hosted by the Nashville Chamber of Commerce and the Entrepreneur Center. There are some great companies and entrepreneurs up for awards this year.

But, is the fact that we even have an awards ceremony one of the warning signs of a bubble? I think so. What about you?

Yup. The World is Sexist. Moving On…

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Let’s face it. It’s not easy being a professional woman. There are assumptions, biases, and glass ceilings. You can be twice as good as the boy next door, but earn half as much. It’s common knowledge that when pitching VCs, women are judged on their past successes, while men are judged on their perceived potential.

The very traits that earn a man respect–assertiveness, confidence, laser focus–usually earn a woman liberal use of the “B” word. (Rhymes with “witch,” y’all.)

But, here’s why none of that fusses me too much:

Life isn’t easy. And of all the obstacles I could face, this one isn’t so bad.

In the early 1900s, immigrant entrepreneurs had it hard, too. They were in a society that–despite “give me your poor and weary” rhetoric–looked down on impoverished immigrants. Many of them were worse off than they would’ve been in their home countries.

But that didn’t stop Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, or Cornelius Vanderbilt from finding a modicum of success.

Those men didn’t agitate for equal access. They didn’t form “immigrant only” business groups. They didn’t throw a fit on social media (or the op-ed of the newspaper) every time an idiot said something stupid about immigrants.

They built their empires. Then, they established foundations that made it easier for others (all others) to build theirs.

The greatest thing we can do to advance the cause of professional women is succeed. Build our empires, then turn around and help the next generation (men and women) follow in our footsteps.

I’ve by no means even begun to reach the level of success I want to, but I’m already helping younger women get a better start in entrepreneurship than I did. And, when we talk about how to survive as women in the world, here are some of the things I tell them.

 

Perfect the Fake it ‘Til You Make It

 

Frankly, I’ve realized that this is basically the only thing men have over women in the workplace: they’re first class liars.

And I mean that in the best possible way.

In general, men know how to make their successes look bigger and their failures look smaller. They also know how to act like they know what they’re doing when they really have no idea.

Women tend to want to be more honest and open. Which ends up looking more like weakness.

Stop.

Instead, get a clear picture of the woman you want to be, the successes you want to accomplish, then act like they’re already reality. Just like the men you know, when you start believing your own hype, you know you’re doing it right.

 

Use What Ya Got

 

My business partner publishes regularly on LinkedIn and has been busting my chops for months to do so as well. When I finally did, my second post garnered 3 times as many page views as his most popular one.

“Well, yeah,” he joked, “Because you got featured on the sexist group ‘Professional Women.’”

(Before you get up in arms, he was truly joking. While he badgered me to write more, he often said I would do better than him because I was already a better writer. Another tip for women: make the men around you your biggest fans.)

But, he was right about my ability to get featured in a popular category, and I’m happy to ride that advantage as far as I can, just like he would do for any strategic advantage he might come across.

Sometimes being the minority isn’t a bad thing. Who cares if you only got a role because they need a token woman. Kick ass in that role and the right people will start to take notice.

 

Understand the Invisible Game

 

I wish it were true that the world was 100% fair. But, like I tell my children daily, it isn’t.

While women shouldn’t spend their time raging against the system, it would be naive to act like the natural biases don’t matter either.

Remember, VCs typically judge women on achievements and men on potential. But, by nature of the startup pitch, there’s probably little “achievement.”

What does this mean to women entrepreneurs? You’ll either work hard to find the right investor, or you’ll have to (get to) bootstrap and maintain control of your company.

Study your surroundings. Know who your cheerleaders are and allow them to help you succeed. Learn the language and ways of the people you want to do business with.

And always, always find a way to provide real value to the people you meet.

Ignore the Assholes

 

Last but not least, no matter what you do or how the world evolves, there will always be assholes. No matter what they say, their actions will prove that they secretly think you should still be home in the kitchen. They’ll be rich and powerful, and you’ll think you can’t do anything without their approval.

You can. And you’ll be better off without them anyway.

That’s the best thing about being an entrepreneur. There is always a solution to a problem, and creativity flourishes under constraints. Work around the assholes–and the system–and that empire’s going to be built faster and more stable than you think it could be.

Finally, don’t assume that all men are out to keep you down. Most of us work in male-dominated industries, but 98% of the men I come across want to see me succeed and are willing to help me in whatever way I ask.

At the end of the day, things aren’t perfect, but we’re sure better off than we were 100 years ago.

Just keep building those empires. Brick by brick.

 

When to Quit Your Startup

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Everyone on the Serious Startups panel has had to make the decision to quit before. And we’re all involved in ventures now that we sometimes wonder if we should walk away from.

Kane, David, and I have slightly different thoughts on how you know when to quit your startup. Check out the video and let us know what you think @seriousstartups.

Luke Harvard: How His Daughter Showed Him the Path to True Fulfillment

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What does it take to be an Entrepreneur? Join us as Luke shares his Entrepreneurial mindset and an inside glance at his journey to becoming a successful Entrepreneur.

Luke is the Founder of Fearless Leadership & Vision Inspired People, a global community of movers and shakers. He advises and mentors business leaders, millionaire entrepreneurs and high profile individuals. His message regularly reaches 700,000 people worldwide on a weekly basis via Vision Inspired People.

Success Quote

  • ‘If you’ve got big dreams, you’ll never be satisfied living a small life.’ – Luke Havard click to tweet!

Business Failure

  • Luke shares a failure of epic proportions. When his 3-year old daughter showed him firsthand what he was missing out on, it not only broke his heart, but straightened him out.

Entrepreneurial AH-HA Moment

  • Transparency is the true key to a life of fulfillment. Be YOU Fire Nation… and be proud of it!

Current Business

  • Luke is blown away with the power of podcasting, and his new Influence Academy is rockin’ and rollin’!

Best Business Book

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Interview Links

rsz_2star_fullThe Podcast Hangout! Join John Lee Dumas on his free weekly Podcast Workshop. Click here to join!

The Advice All Entrepreneurs Should Ignore

advice for entrepreneurs

In 2011, my friend Kostas and I saw an opportunity. If we developed a hyper-accurate keyboard app — one that enabled users to type without looking at the screen — we could change the way people interacted with mobile technology.

We could eliminate the apologetic email signatures, stop walking into things while texting, and truly ditch our laptops. It would break down barriers to the “Internet of Things.”

Everyone said it couldn’t be done, but that was only because no one had done it. Where others saw something impossible, Kostas and I saw an opportunity to be first in a space with huge potential for growth.

Counter the “It’ll Never Work” Objections

When your ideas are ambitious, the tech industry will inevitably try to make you quit.

One of the first people to shoot us down was an angel investor. We had barely finished pitching when he rejected us outright. A touchpad keyboard for the blind wasn’t feasible, he said. Apple’s iOS didn’t allow real integration of third-party keyboards; without the iPhone, the app could never truly be successful.

I countered both objections. Within minutes of our departure, he emailed our mutual contact, complaining that we were “strong-headed” and “ill-informed.” This was a preview of the most common objection we faced: “It’s never been done before.”

Too many people mistake things that haven’t been done for things that can’t be done. Real opportunities come from ideas that haven’t yet been acted upon.

The Benefits of Attempting Something New

Creating an opportunity from something new provides a competitive advantage in the form of:

  1. Brand awareness: Attempting the impossible generates attention. People want to support innovation, and they’ll spread the word for you.
  2. Access to untapped markets: If your product fulfills an unmet need, you’ll have few competitors and many eager customers. Even if you’re small, you can corner the market with a first-mover advantage.
  3. Future potential: By opening the door to multiple opportunities, you’re maximizing your capacity to succeed.
  4. Satisfaction and recruitment: Not only does innovation bolster morale, but it also attracts top talent.

What You Need When Attempting the “Impossible”

Had we listened to our critics, we would have never started. But when developing a revolutionary new product, it’s not the critics who matter — it’s your user base. You need a devoted group of early users who can offer feedback and help improve your product.

During development, I learned that the iPhone’s accessibility options made it popular with blind users, so we brought our prototype to the blind community. Their skepticism quickly gave way to excitement, and for some, the experience was so overwhelming that they wept.

The prototype was basic. But suddenly we had thousands of real users invested in the growth of the product. Their feedback helped each version evolve by leaps and bounds.

Once you have your passionate early users, you also need to find a way to turn perceived barriers into opportunities. When we released a public beta of our app on iOS, many people thought we were crazy due to Apple’s restrictions on third-party keyboards. But in February, we opened our API to any developer who wanted to use it, transforming the restriction into an opportunity for growth.

Never Be Afraid to Do Things Differently

This historical iOS barrier was enough for plenty of people to reject our idea altogether. But because we pursued the opportunity, we are now celebrating 1 million downloads.

Many entrepreneurs fail because they’re afraid to do things differently. But learning to create opportunity is a skill like any other. You can become better by networking, keeping an ear to the ground, and positioning yourself to capitalize on the shifting market. It’s also important to devote several hours a week to trying things that are new, crazy and potentially groundbreaking.

If you ignore opportunity, it will vanish. But when you embrace it, there will always be more.

Ioannis Verdelis is the co-founder and COO of Fleksy, a revolutionary keyboard that makes typing on a touchscreen so easy you can type without even looking. Connect with him on Twitter

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

Why I Came Out of the Mommy Closet

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I have a dirty little secret.

I’ve spent years–well, not hiding it exactly. Just choosing not to showcase it.

But, now it’s time to air my dirty laundry. So to speak.

I’m a mother.

Yup. That’s it. My big secret. And you’re probably wondering why it’s even such a big deal.

Even though I’m proud of my 3 boys, I put a lot of thought into whether or not to incorporate them into my professional life. There are several reasons any woman would consider the same choice I made.

You’re Just Starting Out

There are lots of women who successfully make a name for themselves as a mom. They build blogs or businesses around having a family.

For these women, being loud and proud about motherhood is essential to their personal branding.

But, for women building businesses apart from their families, it can be distracting to talk about motherhood. One friend who is a partner at a venture capital firm told me that she loses Twitter followers every time she tweets about parenting.

In the era of social media and personal branding, you have to think long and hard about what you share. If talking about your family dilutes your brand, it might be best to keep quiet.

That Pesky Glass Ceiling

Like it or not, there is still a glass ceiling for most women.

Draw attention to your uterus and watch that ceiling drop even lower.

In our Serious Startups episode on parenting, Kane expressed surprise that this is true in startups as well as corporate culture.

“There are no rules in startups,” he said incredulously.

But the harsh reality is that there are rules in everything. Startups are a tough environment for mothers because the very nature of entrepreneurship is all-consuming. There is no time for “distractions,” even if they’re cute.

A quick survey of the startup tech scene reveals 2 main demographics for both founders and investors: “men” and “women without children.”

There are exceptions, of course. But, in general, moms starting a non-family-focused business face a huge uphill battle both practically and reputation-wise.

Keep Your Privates Private

The first 2 reasons I’ve talked about can be overcome with time and success. After a certain level of accomplishment or proving yourself, it’s rarely a big deal to reveal your secret.

This last one, though, can apply to moms at any level.

Sometimes, it’s just nobody’s business.

Imagine how awful it would be if everyone had access to all the cute/horrible pictures and stories from your childhood. A simple Google search would show employers pictures of 2-year-old you being potty trained or your mom’s tweets about the time you ate dog poop. That’s reality for the next generation.

Many moms choose to keep their motherhood quiet in order to give their kids a clean digital record.

(FYI: Even though I’m now out of the closet, I still won’t ever publish my kids pictures or names.)

There Comes a Time In Every Mom’s Life…

There are several great reasons for moms to stay quiet about their kids. But sometimes, it’s time to come clean.

As we talked before filming the parenting show, I realized how many women share my dilemma. We’re entrepreneurs, we have kids, and sometimes both of those things work together. Sometimes they don’t.

Either way, it can be isolating–even more than typical entrepreneurship. Admitting my “fatal flaw” to the world is just one more way to battle that isolation and the status quo.

After all, it’s great to know we’re not alone in our rocketship.

Do You Have the Stomach for This?

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Recently I went through a little entrepreneurial funk.

I know I probably shouldn’t admit that in public, but if we’re honest, we know everyone has them. If you’re anything like me, this thought process probably sounds familiar:

  • Crap. I don’t know if I’ll pay the bills this month.

  • I’ve worked 18 hour days every day for a year, but I can’t pay my freaking bills.

  • What’s the best thing I can do right now to make sure the bills get paid?

  • Damn! I don’t want to spend all my time only thinking about the short term. I have dreams…and goals…and and and…!

  • Screw it. What’s the point?

At this point, you’re wondering if your mother was right and you should get a “real job.” Oh, the peace of a regular paycheck, semi-normal work hours, and that long lost thing called a weekend.

I’m not going to tell you to suck it up and keep going. Maybe you’re not cut out for this. Maybe you should do yourself and the rest of the world a favor and find that nice stable job after all. Hey, there’s no shame there, even if we like to glamourize entrepreneurship to the point of it becoming unrecognizable.

I’m not going to tell you to keep chasing your dreams, because this is gut check time. This is when it’s time to really ask yourself, “Do I have the stomach for this?”

What’s your risk tolerance?

This is where you factor in all those people who matter to you. Do you have a spouse and kids? Are their needs being met in some way, preferably that doesn’t involve massive debt?

I’m not saying parents can’t be entrepreneurs, even struggling ones. I’m a single mom, so this is the big question that really hits home for me. My conclusion is that the future I’m building for my kids outweighs the struggles of the present.

But, that may not be your conclusion, which leads to the next question…

What’s your big picture–and is it worth it?

Do you have a long term goal? Or are you just wanting to “be an entrepreneur”? I promise you, being an entrepreneur for its own sake is not all it’s cracked up to be.

Take some time away from the daily grind and really define your goals–concrete things you actually want to accomplish. At the end of the day, will those dreams provide a payoff that exceeds your current struggles?

If not, maybe you should consider a new path, at least until you can define a long term goal worth chasing.

What do your advisers say?

I’m very lucky to have smart business partners who care not just about our business but about me and my family. When both of them consistently said I should not give up yet, I knew they were seeing the bigger picture I was missing.

Talk to people you trust, who know you and your unique situation. Listen to their advice, and when things seem darkest remember that they are probably seeing the pieces you’re missing.

How sleep deprived are you?

You might think this is out of place, but trust me. You don’t want to make major decisions on a sleep deprived brain.

Do whatever is necessary to get a few nights of consistent sleep. Melatonin works wonders for me, and everything starts to make more sense when you catch up on sleep.

What does your gut say?

And, then sometimes, you can’t quantify your thought process. Sometimes the answer is to simply follow your instinct. During my most recent funk, my instinct was to keep going, even when fear was telling me to stop.

If your instinct is to take a break or even stop altogether, go with it. You’ll be happier, healthier, and saner than the rest of us.

Going through hard times is never fun. But, it’s almost always a gift in disguise. Walking through the dark days will reaffirm your passion and vision, making you more confident the next time you struggle.

Or, it will be a big red flag that says it’s time for a new path.

Don’t Tackle An Elephant Head On

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I’ve heard two different philosophies about building a successful company. One school of thought glorifies the idea of “disruption.” These are the Ubers of the world who set out to redefine or create entire industries.

Then there are the founders who believe you should watch what works for others and simply recreate it in order to achieve similar success. This approach can work when taking a model from niche market to niche market or from city to city.

Both models have their champions. And both sets of champions have plenty of bad things to say about the other approach. Personally, I like what I call the “Paul Singh approach.”

Don’t Tackle An Elephant Head On

In our podcast last week, Paul talked about the early days of 500 Startups, taking on giant investing firm Andreessen Horowitz. While Andreessen Horowitz had access to deal flow and didn’t have to work hard at finding investments, 500 Startups was young, unproven, and relatively smaller.

So, Paul and Dave McClure didn’t play the game the same way their larger competitors did. They chose to travel the world, spending most of the year in other cities, speaking and meeting startups. They built their portfolio by going to the companies–the exact opposite strategy most investment firms were using.

This is where “disruption” can play a big role. 500 Startups didn’t invent an industry; but they did re-imagine what an industry could look like and how to get business done. And, as we all know, they were successful with it. If they had chosen to play the same game as larger, more established firms, they probably would’ve lost.

But Know the Rules of the Game

We often hear stories of founders who built successful companies in industries they weren’t familiar with. They attribute their success to “not knowing any better.”

But, that’s not as common as we like to think it is. In the case off 500 Startups, if David and Paul didn’t know much about investing before they started, they learned quickly. After all, it’s vital to understand your industry. More common in real life is the entrepreneur who spent much of her career in a certain industry, saw a problem there, and figured out a way to solve it. Profitably.

If you don’t know the rules of the game you’re playing, you’ll never be able to judge which ones to break and which ones to keep. 99% these are the most important decisions you’ll make as you start up.

Want to know more about the “rules” of the game? We’re launching an awesome webinar series in the next few weeks and would love to have you join us. We’ll be talking about things like idea validation, pitching investors, and crowdfunding. Just pop your email address in the subscribe box, and we’ll keep you updated on all the important details.

The Secret Rules of Startups

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Serious Startups : Unwritten Rules of Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurs are notoriously famous for breaking the rules. But, with startup culture going mainstream, there are a lot of unwritten “rules.” For example, “Thou shalt always be ‘killing it.’”

Check out the video above as the Serious Startups team educates Kane Harrison on all the ways he’s rebelling against startup norms.