10 Tips For Launching Your Startup At An Industry Event

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It’s pretty popular to launch startups at big events. Think Foursquare at SXSW. We even had a couple of launches at this year’s Everywhere Else: The Startup Conference.

But, it can be tricky to launch at a big event. It’s easy to get lost in the noise, and when  you choose to launch that publicly, you better have your act together. Here are some more tips from the veteran entrepreneurs at the Young Entrepreneurs Council:

Give a Keynote Speech

“If you want to launch a new company at an industry event or conference, try to secure an opportunity to be a keynote speaker. If you can’t organically secure it ,consider sponsoring and purchasing the opportunity to be a keynote. As a speaker, you’ll have your target audience listening to you and buying into your brand for 30-40 minutes. There is no better way to secure a flurry of leads.”
- Raoul Davis | CEO, Ascendant Group

Learn from Disrupt

“It’s very helpful to check out the winners of TechCrunch Disrupt. Lot to learn from their presentations and products which can you help launch most effectively.”

- Ben Lang | Founder, Mapped In Israel

Don’t Do It!

“Ignore awards, getting press, and all related “recognition” that will just be distractions when launching your company. Focus on your customers and your product!”

- Todd Garland | Founder, BuySellAds

Influence the Influencers

“Find out who will be the influencers at this conference and get them on board with your new company. Try giving away your product or service to them for free to experience if you have to, so they begin talking about it. There is nothing better than word of mouth, especially when from the mouths that influence more people.”

- Louis Lautman | Founder, Supreme Outsourcing

Try Out Sponsorship

“If you really want to launch right, sponsor the event. Get your brand on everything!”

- Roger Bryan | Managing Partner, ROI Marketing Department

 

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Integrate Your Company In

“Most people that try and launch at an event fail because all they do is display a logo, hand out flyers or take an exhibitor booth. Find a unique way your company can be a part of the event and integrate your product into it, so that more people use it and get to experience it.”

- Aron Schoenfeld | Founder & CEO, Do It In Person LLC

Start Before the Conference

“Once the conference is in full swing, it can be hard to meet with the right people. A small amount of time invested in reaching out to key personalities before the event can yield tremendous results. Review speakers, conference organizers, sponsors and other key attendees, and introduce yourself and your product. You’ll have pre-launch momentum to leverage when going into the conference.”

- Christopher Kelly | Co-Founder, Principal, Convene

Get Outside the Board Room

“Business is done after the day’s events, so throw a crazy party! Get your face and handshake in front of everyone, and then create a forum where you can continue interacting after the formal events are over. They’ll remember your name.”

- Jordan Guernsey | CEO, Molding Box

Make Your Presence Known

“Don’t half-ass the event. Get there early and network to build buzz. Do something creative with your booth or product so everyone knows you’re there. Don’t leave until the end, when you’re sure you’ve done everything to let people know about your product or service.”

- John Hall | CEO, Influence & Co.

Get Mentioned Onstage

“Do your research in advance and know who the speakers are. Before the event, find ways to introduce your company and product via social, introductions, etc. Once there, have your team talking to presenters and panelist so what you’re working on is top of mind. Seeding the conversation prior to them hitting the stage improves your chances of getting mentioned by influencers, and peeking the audience’s interest.”

- Lauren Perkins | Founder and CEO, Perks Consulting

 

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